The acceptance of death in keats poem ode to a nightingale

My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk, Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk: O, for a draught of vintage!

The acceptance of death in keats poem ode to a nightingale

Amina Ben Braiek M. For Keats, concreteness of sensations is more valuable than logic in getting knowledge or wisdom. This stance is explicitly expressed in the "Negative Capability" letter which Keats wrote on March The main idea of Keats's concept of "Negative Capability" is acceptance of the world through a passive attitude to nature in an emotional, sensuous and intuitive communication.

Keats's approach to this concept has no intellectual dimension, it rather has an appeal to feelings and intuition in encountering the world. I will refer to the definition of "Negative Capability" when we talk about the emotional and imaginary communion between the speaker and the nightingale in "Ode to a Nightingale.

We know that powerful feelings is what the English Romantic Poetry is about. Wordsworth dances with the daffodils, while Keats rejoices with the Nightingale's song. In this paper, I will attempt to show that joy is a poetic vision that extends time in fantasy, and accommodates Keats with the idea of death before it actually comes.

Thus, it is a unique vision that presents death as joyful. It is as if Keats lived death twice--one visionary and the other real; one beautiful, and the other tragic.

Joy is an appreciation of beauty in nature; it is a sensuous experience in nature that increases the loveliness of beauty which Keats described as eternal like Truth in his "Ode to a Grecian Urn;" when he says "Beauty Truth, Truth Beauty.

A thing of beauty is a joy forever, its loveliness increases, it will never pass into nothingness; Keats, like his precursor Wordsworth, praises "the language of sense" which allows him to rejoice in contemplating Autumn and the Nightingale. This appreciation of beauty in Nature is not only a Romantic concern but also a poetic sensibility that Keats shared with his fellow Romantics.

They put the senses back into poetry.

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In fact, Wordsworth, the God father of Romantic Poetry in England in the early 19th century, defined good poetry in his "Lyrical Ballads" as: Feelings, sensations and affections are common Romantic preoccupations; and accordingly, poetry for Wordsworth and Keats is about a sensual experience in Nature: Wordsworth's heart is filled with pleasure while Keats appreciates a vision of a peaceful and joyful death.

One of the powerful poems of John Keats is "Ode to a Nightingale: It is a sensational design that survives the melancholy of Keats's own drama. He lost his family and he was suffering from tuberculosis, the disease that fostered the aesthetic beauty of Keats's poetry and yet also killed his intellect.

Thank God it has come. Melancholy is delivered through the nightingale's song; a joyful song yet crying out with sorrow.

Keats identifies with an ambivalent world where the Nightingale sings to cheer him up, yet the song is one of melancholy. The song belongs to Keats's reality, but the bird belongs to the imaginary.

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Keats feels joy as he submits to the nightingale's cheerful world in a romantic vision. The vision of the nightingale encapsulates both the ache of the speaker and the happiness of the bird.

We, as readers, are astonishingly stuck with the poet's consciousness of pain and pleasure: Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, to take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, to cease upon the midnight with no pain, while thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad in such an ecstasy!

Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! Keats's "easeful death" in "Ode to a Nightingale" is joyful. The submission to the enchanting world of the nightingale shows Keats holding his breath softly at a moment of deep joy.

He presents the image of death as beautiful and therefore joyful: Keats gains richness of death in his romantic experience with the nightingale.

John Keats World Literature Analysis - Essay - ph-vs.com

The poet amazingly captures two visions of death, two realities, rather a double-consciousness of death in his poem: Imagination indeed allows Keats to join the immortal bird in the eternal world."Ode to a Nightingale" is a poem by John Keats written either in the garden of the Spaniards Inn, Hampstead, London or, according to Keats' friend Charles Armitage Brown, under a plum tree in the garden of Keats' house at Wentworth Place, also in ph-vs.comy: England.

The Joyful, Easeful Death of John Keats in Ode to a Nightingale Presenter: Amina Ben Braiek M.A. in English Romantic Poetry The present paper addresses the notion of joy in John Keats's "Ode to a Nightingale," which is foregrounded in his letter to his friend Benjamin Bailey on November "O.

The acceptance of death in keats poem ode to a nightingale

The poem ends with an acceptance that pleasure cannot last and that death is an inevitable part of life. In the poem, Keats imagines the loss of the physical world and sees himself dead—as a "sod" over which the nightingale sings.

Poem "Ode to a Nightingale" was written by John Keats in May of in the garden of Hampstead, area of London. Video added, read and download pdf-file. "Ode to a Nightingale" is a poem by John Keats written either in the garden of the Spaniards Inn, Hampstead, London or, according to Keats' friend Charles Armitage Brown, under a plum tree in the garden of Keats' house at .

The Critical Analysis of The Poem ―Ode to a Nightingale‖ by John Keats through Iser‘s Theory of the Act of Reading and that Guerard misunderstands Keats's ph-vs.com all, the acceptance of the loss of pleasure by the end of the poem is an acceptance life and, of in turn, of death.

With this theme of a loss of pleasure and.

Ode to a Nightingale - Wikipedia